End of an Era

Some of you will already know by now that Video City is to close its doors (in its physical presence!) for the last time on Wednesday 24th June, after 30 years in Notting Hill.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank all of you for supporting us so magnificently over the years and for making it such a hugely enjoyable experience in recommending and discussing a wealth of cinema from all over the world.

Due to ever changing technology it has become apparent that the physical sale and rental of DVD’s is becoming difficult to maintain, but our belief is that a knowledge and love of film should enable us, in the not too distant future, to offer an expertly curated choice of film through a digital delivery system. It won’t happen overnight but I would urge you all, if you are interested, to leave us your email address so that we can hopefully renew our relationship with you in a new medium.

We will carry on renting and selling films in the remaining weeks and we hope that you will continue to support us in that time period. We will be offering plenty of bargains (new and ex-rental), so why not take this opportunity to start or add to your personal collections.

I can only reiterate what an absolute privilege it has been for myself and all of my colleagues to have shared our passion for films with you over the many years we have been in Notting Hill. We hope to be seeing some, if not all of you, again at a later date

Simon Brzeskwinski

Send your email address to info@videocitylondon.com

Preview: The 87th Annual Old White Guy Awards

gurus-top8-021815It seems like the biggest stories of this year’s Oscars have been those films and people not nominated, rather than those who were. Much has been made of the fact that not a single nominee in the Best Director or either Screenplay categories are either female or African-American, despite the presence of presumed contenders Ava DuVernay, who directed Selma or Gillian Flynn, who adapted her own novel Gone Girl from page to screen. Add to this the fact that the Academy also nominated 20 white actors in its acting categories, one almost gets the feeling if it could nominate 10 old men for the Best Actress categories it would, if only the rules would allow it.

imageBoyhood.

Moving on from these and other snubs, though (LEGO Movie, anyone?!), the race for Best Picture seems to have come down to two very different films: Richard Linklater’s Boyhood, which has the backing of most critics, and Alejandro Gonzalez-Iñárritu’s Birdman, which seems to have the majority of industry support. The criticism has been leveled at both that they are merely gimmicks, in Boyhood‘s case that it was filmed over 12 years and in Birdman‘s that it is made to look like one single continuous take from beginning to end. But both are brilliant, unique films that completely deserve their nominations. So which is going to take home the big prize?

birdman-01Birdman.

Right now, the smart money is on Birdman. It is this year’s most-nominated film (tied with The Grand Budapest Hotel with 9 apiece) and all the recent momentum seems to have swung its way. It also seems likely to take home awards for Director, Original Screenplay and Cinematography. Of course Boyhood is certainly in with a shout and if it manages an upset in Picture it will almost certainly take Best Director too, but at the moment it looks like a solitary win for Patricia Arquette’s magnificent performance in Best Supporting Actress for the one-time frontrunner.

Birdman is a film of the moment, edgy and fast-paced and it’s about ‘the business’, precisely the sort of back-patting ego-inflater the Academy loves (I mean, it also happens to be an excellent film which helps, at least). But one can’t help the feeling that if it isn’t Boyhood‘s name called on the night, it may just be the latest in Oscar’s long-running tradition of should-have-won films that we look back on in years to come with hands on heads. Boyhood is sure to go down in history as a great piece of American cinema from Richard Linklater, some would say his generation’s greatest American director  – but is it what the Academy likes?

the-theory-of-everything-eddie-redmayne-2-3Eddie Redmayne as Hawking in Theory of Everything.

The only major award Birdman seems likely to lose is Best Actor, which is surprising considering Michael Keaton’s mammoth performance. But in a tight race it looks like it’s Eddie Redmayne’s to lose. Redmayne has surged late in the running with his remarkable work as Stephen Hawking in The Theory of Everything. The Academy loves a true story and a physical transformation, and Redmayne nails both with aplomb. Although Bradley Cooper scores his third consecutive nomination for his flag-waving work in American Sniper, he and fellow nominees Benedict Cumberbatch and Steve Carell will all just be happy to be there.

What a pity that far and away the year’s best performance, from David Oyelowo as Martin Luther King, jr. in Selma has been ignored. I wonder why. I mean, the Academy did nominate Laurence Olivier for playing Othello in blackface…but that’s none of my business.

still-aliceMoore in Still Alice.

The other acting categories are all but sewn up. Julianne Moore will get her long overdue statue for her work in Still Alice, while JK Simmons (Whiplash) and Patricia Arquette (Boyhood) will complete this year’s line-up with deserved wins. In another year without Moore perhaps Reese Witherspoon (Wild) or Marion Cotillard (Two Days, One Night) might have challenged but both already have Oscars of their own and the Academy’s old white men- I’m so sorry, old wise men have decided its ‘time’ to honour one of the best actresses working for the last 20 years.

Ida1Ida.

There are still a few unpredictable races scattered throughout, like Best Foreign Language Film. Despite many predicting Pawel Pawlikowski’s majestic Ida, this category has seen many upsets in recent years, so don’t be surprised to hear Argentina’s Wild Tales called out and that’s what I’m predicting to win. There’s even an outside chance of Russia’s searingly powerful Leviathan taking home the award, but in the past US foreign relations have played a bigger role than they maybe should have in determining this one and so it seem unlikely we shall see a Russian winner. On the documentary front it would seem that Edward Snowden doc Citizenfour  is going to be the one to beat, though keep an eye out for the wonderful Finding Vivian Maier, an in-store favourite, although it’s unlikely to be an upset this year.

Things to Keep an Eye Out For:

  • Neil Patrick Harris is the latest brave soul to take on the task of hosting the ceremony. Can he revitalize the world’s most popular roomful of old white millionaires?
  • Best Cinematography sees veteran Dick Pope finally nominated for Mike Leigh’s Mr. Turner. Can either he or equally overdue legend Roger Deakins (Unbroken) claim a statuette or will we see Birdman’s Emmanuel Lubezki win for a second consecutive year (he took it home last year for Gravity)?
  • Just how much support will dark horses Grand Budapest Hotel and American Sniper have? Both could easily come away with 3 or 4 statues of their own. If any films are going to sneakily prove popular choices, it’s these two. Expect Sniper to challenge for both Sound categories, Editing and perhaps even Adapted Screenplay. Expect Grand Budapest to be up for it in Costume, Production Design, Hair and Make-Up, Cinematography and maybe even Original Screenplay if it’s really loved.
  • With no Gone Girl in Best Adapted Screenplay, it could go anywhere. Expect it to be one of the Brit biopics. Either further love for Theory of Everything (along with Best Actor and potentially Score) or a consolation for The Imitation Game.
  • Animated Film frontrunner The LEGO Movie was a shock omission, so will the completely wonderful Boxtrolls get it’s due or will we be learning How to Train Your Dragon?
  • The one nomination LEGO did get was for it’s hit theme song “Everything is Awesome”, expect song to come down to this versus Selma’s Glory”, which might end up being the ‘sorry-we-were-racist’ prize for 2015.

And finally, will it be Inarritu and Birdman or Linklater and Boyhood that come out on top? While some are predicting a split between Best Director and Best Picture, this is rare (ignore the fact that it’s happened in both the last 2 years, it’s RARE I tell you!) and whichever man wins is likely to see his film win too.

Selma-FilmSelma.

Fingers crossed on this end for Boyhood (or, in a perfect world, Selma – but that’s so unlikely it’s actually past the point of parody) but regardless of which film wins, either would be one of the most artistically daring projects the Academy has ever gone for, so good luck to all!

Posted by David.

On my birthday, I want to be alone…

Happy Birthday, Greta Garbo!

Film and Television“Upside-downy”: The Face that launched so many others.

On the day of her birth, watch her utter her first speaking words in Anna Christie (1930) (“gimme a whiskey… and don’t be stingy, baby!”), which created mini-hysteria with the phrase ‘Garbo Talks!’ flying about in a media-frenzy:

Greta’s most famous words, however, come from Grand Hotel (1932) – dir. Edmund Goulding (Dark Victory, Razor’s Edge):

“I WANT TO BE ALONE….”

Bellow is a letter the great Aloof One wrote to her friend Grace Kelly, AKA Princess Grace of Monaco, explaining, in the nicest possible way, that she’d really rather not right now, thanks all the same:

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xxx

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xxx

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I know who I’d rather be.

***

Watch out for the up-coming and worrying Grace of Monaco, starring Nicole Kidman.

(Source of letter: notorious-mag.com)

posted by Dixie Turner

The buzz on bees…

Bees are a funny business. One minute they’re in deadly peril, the next, they’re cruising for bargains down the local high street – with an apparent soft-spot for Topshop.

Environmentalists have been up in arms about their dwindling numbers for years, warning about the devastation that this will have on our food supply, and reminding us of such facts as ONE SINGLE TEA SPOON OF HONEY IS EQUAL TO THE  LIFES WORK OF TWELVE HONEY BEES and that, when taking those long, lush honey baths we’re all so used to, we should at least remember to pop down to Wholefoods to be sure to fill our tubs with organic.

Now that bees appear to be dropping like flies, it seems we may all need to start cultivating an appetite for alternative food sources. Our future shopping lists may well included Heinz Baked Ants (bees would be so much better here, but, alas…), Walkers salt and vinegar (will we have grapes to make vinegar?) flavoured crickets, and Levi Roots’ Jerk Spiders. Well, that sounds fine, but, whilst dining out: “Would madam care for a bamboo soup?” Hmm. You’ve lost me there.  “And for desert, a self-pollinating apple tart?” I know a self-pollinating apple will look just like a normal apple, but I keep picturing it spinning in my hand. (If you were round and self-pollinating, wouldn’t you spend your time just rolling in yourself?)

Anyway, to prepare us for the appetising eventuality of this screaming disaster, here are a few documentaries to keep us up at night (standing in the glow of the open fridge, taking a mental picture of the contents as a keepsake…):

BeesVanishing of the Bees (2009)

MV5BMTYwMDA1NDI1MF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwNDM0MzQ4OQ@@._V1_SX640_SY720_More than Honey (2012)

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OR JUST CLICK HERE

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posted by Dixie Turner

Get On/Go Out/Get Off/Get Down: Film-related News and Events

BIRDS EYE VIEW FILM FESTIVAL:

LuckyThere’s still time to catch this festival – ending this Sunday – which celebrates and champions the work of female directors from around the world. Ones to watch out for include Night Moves (loving the wonderfully enigmatic trailer), the new feature by Kelly Reichardt, director of the excellent Wendy and Lucy (2008) and Meek’s Cutoff (2010) which is showing on Friday night. Also, there’s a chance to catch a rare screening of Claudia Weill’s  Girlfriends (1978) which is being shown on Sunday. Now considered something of a classic of late 70s independent US cinema, the film was originally championed by Stanley Kubrick but later fell into semi-obscurity. Fortunately, the film has been picked back up by a new generation of film-makers in recent years. Lena Dunham has cited it as an inspiration and its influence on her series Girls is clear; there are also clear parallels with Noah Baumbach and Greta Gerwig’s Frances Ha (2012), so fans of these should nip down there and guzzle up the good stuff. The documentary, Lucky (pictured above), by former journalist, Laura Checkoway, about a spirited single mother living on the streets of New York also looks like one to catch. The festival screening has sadly passed, but there’s still a chance to catch it at the Lexi Cinema in Kensal Green on Tuesday the 15th April.

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DRUNKEN BUTTERFLIES:

I3PLzYlbAn independent, Newcastle-based production directed by Garry Sykes, centering around a gang of teenaged girls and featuring production design by our very own Tom Moore, is screening as part of the London Independent Film Festival this Sunday – check the LIFF website for details and head down there (TONIGHT WE ARE GOOD WE ARE FINE)! The festival runs from 10th-21st April.

FRINGE! FILM FESTIVAL:

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The queer film and arts festival is back this weekend with its Spring Fling: a collection of screenings, talks and parties dotted around Hackney.

TATE MODERN: MAGICIENS DE LA TERRE: RECONSIDERED:

markerresnaislesstatuesmeurentaussiMarking the 25th anniversary of the controversial exhibition in Paris, Magiciens de la Terre, which exhibited works of over 100 artists, many of whom were described as non-western, Tate Modern has put together a tasty-looking collection of screenings which “offers reflection on the cinematic history and legacy of colonialism, on developments within ethnographic film and on emerging discourses of globalisation. The diverse programme includes works by David Byrne, Maya Deren, Len Lye, Chris Marker, Claes Oldenburg, Alain Resnais, Jean Rouch and Dziga Vertov, together with significant contributions by filmmakers who are less well-known in the UK. The films are contextualised through discussion with original contributors to Magiciens and contemporary respondents.” – Tate Modern website

CHRIS MARKER RETROSPECTIVE AT THE WHITECHAPEL GALLERY:

la-jetee-orlyA fine chance to get a comprehensive look at one of the 20th Century’s great filmmaker-photographer-writer-artists. Come in and grab Sans Soleil/La Jetee in preparation for the exhibition which runs from 16th April-22nd June.

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MICKEY ROONEY (1920-2014)

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posted by Dixie Turner

 

Oscar Catch-Up

So the Academy Awards are upon us once again – that prize bestowed by the institution made up of the most powerful string-pullers in the business… Of course, box office success has nothing to do with the outcome and everyone goes home a radiant and gracious winner – especially those whose paychecks have just quadrupled.  Watch for the stumbles, the cracked smiles, the false hope, the tears and, yes, the plastic surgery. Hecklers welcome. Streakers encouraged.

Below are the nominated films that are available on DVD for you to catch-up on. Pull your facial skin taut, perfect your frozen smile and watch with your fanciest frock on… And then – judge for yourselves!

gravity-posterNominated for 10 awards, including Best Picture and Best Directing (Alfonso Cuaron)

Plus – Cuaron Catch-up:little_princess_ver3A Little Princess (1995) – Apparently Alfonso’s personal favourite amongst his films.

y_tu_mama_tambien_ver2Y Tu Mama Tambien (2001) – Two young friends meet up with an older woman in this edgy, sexy coming of age road movie that rocketed Gael Garcia Bernal  to international stardom.

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Children of Men (2006) – Apocalyptic sci-fi drama starring the utterly unenigmatic Clive Owen – the miracle of pregnancy in an otherwise sterile world leads Clive to take extraordinary measures in an attempt to save the human race.

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captain_phillips_ver2_xlrgCaptain Phillips

Nominated for Best Picture, Best Supporting Actor (Barkhad Abdi) and Best Editing.

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blue_jasmine_ver2Blue Jasmin

Nominated for Best Actress ( Cate Blanchett) and Best Supporting Actress (Sally Hawkins).

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Prisoners+PosterPrisoners

Nominated for Best Cinematography.

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115276Great Gatsby

Nominated for Best Costume Design.

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Act of Killing

Impressive and hard to watch, Act of Killing places  former torturers and exectutioners from the Indonesian anti-communist purge of the mid ’60s back in their bloody roles and watches as they eagerly reenact their crimes…

&

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Cutie and the Boxer follows the life and marriage of two Japanese artists living in New York since the ’60s, one seriously overshadowed by the work – and personality – of the other (guess which is which).

– both nominated for Best Documentary.

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Great Beauty

by Paulo Sorrentino (Consequences of Love, Il Divo, This Must Be the Place)

&

the_hunt_2012The Hunt by Thomas Vinterberg (Festen) and starring the excellent Mads Mikkelsen (After the Wedding, Royal Affair) – an excellent study of the effect that doubt and distrust can have in a small tight-knit community.. a man is falsely accused by a small child of abusing her and quickly finds his whole life turned upside down as those he trusted and thought of as friends turn against him.

&

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Broken Circle Breakdown

– all nominated for Best Foreign Feature.

WATCH TONIGHT TO FIND OUT WHO THE WINNERS AND LOSERS ARE – OR JUST GET A GOOD NIGHT’S KIP INSTEAD AND CATCH IT ALL IN THE 25 PAGE SPREAD IN TOMORROW’S STANDARD/METRO… (well, there’s nothing else going on, is there?)

POSTED BY DIXIE TURNER

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Philip Seymour Hoffman

Actor Philip Seymour Hoffman-1527808We at Video City have long been fans of the extraordinary talent of Philip Seymour Hoffman (a fact evidenced by our long-standing ‘Philip See-More Hoffman’ shelf) and are deeply saddened to hear of his passing. There is rarely a week that goes by when one of his films, be it the gently poignant Jack Goes Boating (Hoffman’s directorial debut), A Late Quartet or Happiness, doesn’t grace our Staff Picks shelf.

A beautiful actor who could at once show great vulnerability, troubled confidence, frustrated desire and an anger bubbling beneath the surface that could leap out in dangerous, burning flashes – it made him wonderful to watch.

Jack Goes Boating (2010)

A Late Quartet (2012)

Capote (2005)

posted by Dixie Turner

O So Topical: London On Film

From Notting Hill to the far-flung reaches of Westbourne Park and the darkest corners of Portobello – oh yes, the explorations of the Notting Hill flaneur knows no bounds… And so, to tie-in with the Barbican’s film season, Urban Wandering, we have gathered together, from the far corners of our shop (through France and Germany; right at Gandolf; straight ahead and over the New Releases; a pit-stop at Ealing; left at Ryan Gosling; left again at F-For Fake and straight on to…), a selection of our top London-based films… (go on: stretch your legs – or, at the very least, your eyes):
NIGHT AND THE CITY

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PEEPING TOM

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BLOW UP

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LONDON NOBODY KNOWS

London Nobody Knows 5 Hanbury Street

LONDON MODERN BABYLON

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NAKED

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AMERICAN WEREWOLF IN LONDON

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TREACLE JR

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PERFORMANCE

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ALFIE

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VILLAIN

Villain small

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by Dixie Turner

CINEMA CATCH-UP: Man of Steel and Before Midnight

297058-binoculars_superFor all those of you intending to venture into the glorious outside, that wonderous world of Beyond (beyond the computer; beyond the desk; beyond the living room, the news reports and the school runs; beyond that pile of unread books – and, yes, beyond your binoculars); for those of you preparing to pierce the threshold of the Everyday and peer, as though new-born, at the blinking, milky expanse they refer to as the ‘sky’, REMEMBER: have your sunglasses and umbrellas at hand, your parasols and wellies on person and the snow plough fully tanked, because – lets face it – you just never know.

If, on the other hand, you’re intending to venture into the glorious outside in order to step into that alternate inside known as the Wonderous World of Beyond Your Television AKA The Cinema, preparations of another sort may well be in order.

Man-of-Steel-Comic-Con-2012-Poster-man-of-steel-31481919-810-1198

If you’re thinking of heading out to watch Zack (Watchmen/300) Snyder’s Man of Steel, then you may want to catch up on the Caped-One’s previous escapades. Most recently, in Superman Returns:

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The 2006 film, directed by Bryan (Usual Suspects) Singer and starring Brandon Routh (Scott Pilgrim) as the man in the red pants and Kevin Spacey as Lex Luther, sees Superman returning to planet Earth after a long sojourn visiting the ruins of Krypton.

Of course, the films you should probably be catching up on, however, are the ones with Christopher Reeve who will forever be burned in our minds in the brightest of bright costumes (with the bluest of blue eyes):

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… and still we swoon.

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If, on the other hand, boys in tights just aren’t your bag and you prefer a bit of sweaty chin fuzz (how does Ethan Hawke manage to maintain that pubescent look, even now at.. 65?), then you’re probably after the existential ruminations of that ‘will-they/won’t they’ would-be couple, Jesse and Celine. The couple are nearly 20 years on from their first star-crossed meeting. Check out how it all began in Richard Linklater’s Before Sunrise and the sequel, made 10 years later, Before Sunset:

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Trailer

by Dixie Turner

Michael Moore: Smug, Self-Righteous and Generally a Bit Annoying, But Still…

Michael-Moore

…Happy Birthday, anyway.

If you haven’t seen Bowling for Columbine, now’s probably as good a time as any. In light of America’s continued inability to curb its gun laws, Bowling for Columbine – which looks at America’s fascination with bearing arms in light of the Columbine High School tragedy – is a pretty topical watch. Amongst the most memorable moments are the scene in which Moore goes to a bank that gives away a free rifle when you open up an account (am pretty sure Nat West won’t even give you a smile) and the footage of (and subsequent interview with) Charlton Heston, former president of the National Rifle Association, yelling “From my cold dead hands” as he holds aloft a rifle at a rally. Who will ever watch The Ten Commandments and think of Moses in the same way again?

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From: “Thou shalt not kill”…

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…to: “FROM MY COLD DEAD HANDS”. Wow.

(In some respects, of course, it’s perhaps not such a leap. I mean, if there has to be a National Rifle Association, there’s a beautifully warped logic to having Moses as President. Who better than Moses to remind you of your right to defend yourself when your adulterous wife steps out with another man? Defend your moral indignation by shooting him down (but, take heed: it’s only righteous if you have two fingers resting on the Bible whilst you pull the trigger). Lockheed Martin’s new logo will feature Gandhi riding a nuclear missile and I’m sure World War III will be brought to us by Disney. Freedom will be delivered with deadly force, and Mickey Mouse ears. God Bless America (P.S. Thou shalt not kill).)

So, thank you Michael Moore for ruining Ben-Hur and El Cid etc. Now, when I think of Touch of Evil, I of course think of it as one of the greatest – and last – of the film noirs; I think of the incredible cinematography and Orson Welles’ incredible bulk – but in the back of my mind is a new and annoying association between the name Charlton Heston and the words ‘touch-of-evil’.

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Charlton ‘Touch of Evil’ Heston and the incredible bulk of Orson Welles.

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Anyway. It’s also worth having a look at the documentary made about Michael Moore (Manufacturing Dissent). Whilst not being a fantastic piece of filmmaking (and obviously having an agenda of its own), some of the aspects of Moore’s allegedly less-than-ethical methods of journalism that it digs up are a bit of an eye-opener. Not sure Noam Chomsky would approve.

By the way, if you’ve seen Farenheit 9/11 and thought that was good, it’s worth checking out Why We Fight, by Eugene Jarecki (director of the more recent, and excellent, House I Live In), all about the arms trade – that’s a real eye-opener. Happy hunting!

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by Dixie Turner

Film of the Day: No, I’m Not Going To Write About Maggie Thatcher…

… or mention the film The Iron Lady. Phew. Finally, a Thatcher-free haven. And I’m not talking about Britain, now that she’s gone. In fact, I’m not talking about her at all. MaggieMaggieMaggie. I’m not talking about her because everyone else in the country is and you can’t look at a paper without a thousand words on her legacy, her funeral, the fact that she wore hats (and, apparently, sometimes even gloves) and occasionally smiled (despite cracks clearly appearing around her heart as she did so) being thrust into your face. This is a Maggie-free zone. So…

 

FILM OF THE DAY:

My-Beautiful-Laundrette-1985

“I’m a professional businessman not a professional Pakistani. And there is no question of race in the new enterprise culture.”

A LAUNDERETTE AS BIG AS THE RITZ. OH YES.

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Johnny: “Ain’t nothing I can say to make it up to you. There’s only things I can do to show you… That I am with you.”

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**THIS IS ENGLAND ’85**

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STEPHEN FREARS’ AND HANIF  KUREISHI’S 1985 FILM IS AN IRONIC SALUTE TO THE THATCHER-CHAMPIONED SPIRIT OF PRIVATE CAPITALISTIC ENTERPRISE. IT ALSO THROWS CLASS, RACE AND INTERRACIAL RELATIONSHIPS INTO THE MAGGIE-MELTING POT AND JABS HOLES IN THE IRON-CLAD TORY TENET OF ‘FAMILY VALUES’ BY FEATURING A SUCCESSFUL GAY RELATIONSHIP AS ONE OF THE CENTRAL STORYLINES.

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DID I SAY THIS WAS A MAGGIE-FREE ZONE? MY MISTAKE.

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posted by Dixie Turner

FILM OF THE DAY: PAGE ONE – INSIDE THE NEW YORK TIMES (2011)

“Could the New York Times go out of business?”

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“WE’RE HERE TO TAKE NOTE OF THE FACT THAT JOURNALISM IS ALIVE AND WELL, AND FEISTY…”

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ONLINE VS. PRINT – THE COLLISION OF TWO WORLDS.

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David Carr: “Y’know what this reminds me of? A newspaper! Is this the bridge to the future or… no, it’s a gallows!”

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REGULATION OF A DYING INDUSTRY? WHAT IS TO BE THE FATE OF PRINT MEDIA AND HOW MANY OF THESE JOURNALISTS WILL BE EMPLOYED TO RUN A BLOG…?

(O, So Topical) Film of the Day: HACKERS (1995)

What happened when Generation-X moved on from Sonic the Hedgehog – starring Angelina Jolie and Jonny Lee Miller.

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THE PLAGUE: “LET ME EXPLAIN THE NEW WORLD ORDER. GOVERNMENTS AND CORPORATIONS NEED PEOPLE LIKE YOU AND ME. WE ARE SAMURAI… THE KEYBOARD COWBOYS… AND ALL THOSE OTHER PEOPLE WHO HAVE NO IDEA WHAT’S GOING ON ARE THE CATTLE.”

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Kate Libby: Never send a boy to do a woman’s job.

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Dade Murphy: I don’t play well with others.

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WE HAVE JUST GOTTEN A WAKE-UP CALL FROM THE NINTENDO GENERATION

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Meanwhile, back at News of the World…

posted by Dixie Turner