New Releases: 22nd December and Boxing Day

22nd:

THE INBETWEENERS 2:

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THE GUVNORS:

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26th:

DOWNTON ABBEY: A MOORLAND HOLIDAY:

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THE FALL SEASON 2:

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MERRY CHRISTMAS EVERYONE. HOPE YOU GET WHAT YOU WANT.

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QUIZ-THOUGHT OF THE WEEK:

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 Name the film and win yourself a highly coveted smile from a Video City staff member of your choice (please note that Dixie is away at the moment). As if that weren’t enough, we are also giving away free pats on the back. And, yes, you can have one of those special ‘yes, you are the cleverest one of all’ looks. Ok, and you can also have one of our Video City tote bags to swing into the New Year. Just take it all, why don’t you?

Posted by Old Saint Nick

Is Die Hard a Christmas Film?

The Well of Souls

Die Hard (1988, John McTiernan)

Most Christmas films are awful. Most films in general are awful, so it’s not surprising. But are the good ones, the ones actually worth your time, even Christmas films at all? Where do we draw the line between Christmas as a setting and Christmas as a genre? In consequence, I propose a new subgenre: the almost-a-Christmas film. Obvious examples for our fantasy Blockbuster Video section would be: Diner, Trading Places, Gremlins, Batman Returns, every film written by Shane Black, and, of course, John McTiernan’s Die Hard.

These films have Christmas as a setting, but it’s of little or no importance to the story. Die Hard doesn’t need to be set at Christmas; it’s only necessary that a party is taking place at Nakatomi Plaza for the “Eurotrash” terrorists to gatecrash. However, and this is the key to an almost-a-Christmas film, Die Hard would lose…

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5 Days Until…

…our shopping nightmares are over and we can be truly grateful for some peace and quiet. Until the booze pours and the crackers bang.

Whether you find this time of year utterly delightful and are one of those who are disposed towards tinselling the house sometime in mid-May, or you rather can’t wait to tear the cracking smile off your face, rip down your one decoration left over from Xmas ’95 and bury your head in a rum-soaked pud and slide under the table away from the glare of the in-laws – here to help us navigate all that Christmas cheer and balance all the festive fun, are a few not-so obvious titles to keep us in the mood, without (hopefully) slipping into a mood.

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Joyeux Noel (2005), starring Daniel Bruhl, Dany Boon, Gary Lewis and Diane Kruger. Directed by Christian Carion

The true story of the Christmas truce in mid-trench hell in 1914, between Scottish, German and French troops who decided to welcome Christmas in together with a cheering game of football.

When dealing with warring family-members, a good one to remember, perhaps..

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Meet John Doe (1941), starring a BEAUTIFUL Gary Cooper, a fast-talking Barbara Stanwyck and the inimitable Walter Brennan. Directed by Frank Capra.

An ex ball-player turned hobo is picked up by a newspaper woman to pose as the author of heartfelt and politically incendiary articles published by her paper which, in fact, she has been writing herself. The make-believe author, John Doe, pledges to kill himself by leaping from a building on Christmas Eve in protest over the corrupt politicians and the conditions of the working classes. Classic Capra stuff – tear-jerking romance with a big message.

Gobble it up with your turkey!

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A couple of nice foreign posters – and always interesting (and amusing) to see how film titles are translated in other languages.. And in this case, to see who Joe Bloggs is abroad – i.e.Juan Nadie in Spain. Good to know!

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Gremlins (1984), starring Zachary Galligan, Phoebe Cates and Corey Feldman and directed by Joe Dante.

You know that present – the one that looks hastily-wrapped? The one that has all the holes punched in it? That last one that’s sitting and rattling under the tree? Well, it’s not a puppy..

Fancy a pet? Be careful what you wish for.

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Rare Exports: A Christmas Tale (2010) a directed by Jalmari Helander.

Finnish horror-fantasy-Christmas tale that’ll make you truly sorry for your misdeeds this year. Block your chimneys, boys and girls – Santa’s coming for you.

P.S. Don’t bother leaving out milk and cookies…

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Posted by Dixie Turner

New Releases: 15th December

SIN CITY 2: A DAME TO KILL FOR:

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INTO THE STORM:

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Posted by William

(Belated) 2 Week New Release Double Whammy: 1st and 8th December

THE EXPENDABLES 3:

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CHARLIE’S COUNTRY:

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THE CONGRESS:

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THE NUT JOB:

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WHAT IF:

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STEP UP ALL IN:

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HERCULES:

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PLANES: FIRE & RESCUE:

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GOODBYE TO LANGUAGE:

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THE KINGDOM OF DREAMS AND MADNESS:

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Posted by William

RoboCop (1987) Is an Almost Perfectly Symmetrical Film

Deja Reviewer

The Old Testament is full of examples of chiasmus, which is a figure of speech used in ancient times to emphasize balance. It lists a bunch of ideas or things and then repeats each of them in reverse order. It’s often not an identical repetition. It frequently uses the opposite of what came before or something similar to it.

Here’s a simple chiasmus I came up with to show you what it looks like:

A. The cat was heavy

 B. She ate too much food

  C. Something had to change

 B. I gave her less food to eat

A. Now she’s less heavy

The first and last lines are similar, the second and fourth lines are opposite but related, and the third line is the turning point that links the ideas contained in the chiasmus.

Why am I giving a grammar lesson? Because I’ve noticed this same…

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